PF detail from Pierre-Auguste Renoir - Beach Scene, Guernsey (Children by the Sea in Guernsey) - 1883;

ISSN 
1942-2067

Copyright © 2009 Pirene's Fountain.

All Rights Reserved.

Last updated:
May 2009

 

Ray Succre currently lives on the southern Oregon coast, U.S., with his wife and young son.  He has been published in Aesthetica, Quantum Leap, and Takahe, as well as in numerous others across as many countries.  He has been nominated for a Pushcart and his novel Tatterdemalion (Cauliay Publishing) was recently released in print and is available most places.  He tries hard.

Close as Kin | Ladies and Gentlemen, Animal Snouts

 

Close as Kin

Every vision someone summons
ashames the present,
though remarks vividly on the self,
on the can’t-speak-of.

They have had one thousand dreams.
They have dog-paddled in them.
They have them, eating through,
dreams as by nightly post,
suffocating, ginger, inlaid with
flickering thoughts
and freely tucked in.

They have them, every vision,
clustered like kernels,
festered in close as kin
to the cobb.

We have had one thousand dreams,
too soon twisted like tumblers in a lock.

 

Ladies and Gentlemen, Animal Snouts

Our faunatic people format decisions
on their appearance through adolescence,
pubertal to prime, that span
where animals are ugliest,
long faces, unadjusted mouths,
heaved noses, ferrous eyebrows,
all the acne of life.

I decided my outward aspects bad
at seventeen, without checking
for a decade, only to discover
one morning from a shower
that I was one nudge past fair
one fourth of each day.

I’ve greeted so many that considered
their portions handsome or pretty
that were neither, or that quickly concluded
their face a frank hideousness
that was not, so many in flight,
people like wild, bursting tanagers,
and now I can’t hear them
for talking talking talking,
and am quite behind the times.

The paintings at Bonampak were preserved when a layer of calcium carbonate covered the paintings, preventing moisture from destroying them. The murals, which date from 790, show scenes of nobility, battle, and sacrifice. At San Bartolo, murals were discovered in 2001. These paintings date from 100 A.D., and are the some of the oldest Maya paintings discovered.